Utah Teen Charged With Theft of a Rental Vehicle

A 19 year old Utah teen was arrested on Christmas Day for theft of a rental vehicle after fleeing from police in a U-Haul van that was two weeks late being returned.

Failure to stop for police officer

Photo by: Roland Tanglao

19 year Russian-born United States citizen Murad Mansurovich Kurbanov was spotted in Murray, Utah driving a rental vehicle that had been reported stolen after not being returned on time to the rental company. When officer attempted to pull Kurbanov over in the stolen U-Haul van, he continued on – driving through multiple red lights and recklessly weaving in and out of traffic. Kurbanov eventually ditched the van in an apartment lot parking lot, attempting to pass himself off as a visitor to one of the tenants.

Theft of a rental vehicle

Kurbanov was questioned by police and after his story was not adding up, officers were able to tie him to the abandoned U-Haul and arrested him for multiple charges including theft of a rental vehicle. Utah Code 76-6-410.5 states “A renter is guilty of theft of a rental vehicle if, without notice to and permission of the rental company, the renter knowingly fails without good cause to return the vehicle within 72 hours after the time established for the return in the rental agreement.” Theft of a rental vehicle is punishable as a second degree felony, the same as theft of any motor vehicle as stated in section 76-6-412.

Teens and rental vehicles

Many wonder why a teenager, even an older one, was allowed to rent the U-Haul van in the first place. Several rental vehicle companies require the driver to be 25 years age or older to rent a vehicle with them. Some companies however, allow younger drivers to rent with them but require a young driver fee that could be nearly as much as the daily fee for the vehicle rental itself. Unknown to many, there are in fact quite a few rental companies that let persons as young as 18 rent vehicles which is in line with federal law. According to their website, U-Haul allows teens as young as 18 to rent their drivable trucks while even younger 16 year olds are permitted to rent their pull-along trailers. Regardless of the age of the responsible party, anyone renting a vehicle is expected to return the vehicle or trailer by the agreed upon time or they could face criminal charges.

Students Arrested for Vehicle Theft after Police Pursuit Ends at Utah School

Two Utah students were arrested for vehicle theft after a police pursuit came to an end at their West Jordan high school.

Stealing a ride to school

Photo by: Mark Walker

While many high school students have a hard time waking up in time for class, two teens in West Jordan were up early enough to steal a vehicle. A few hours before Monday morning classes began, two teens found an unattended truck a couple miles away from Copper Hills High School and decided to take it for a spin. The teens were caught on camera speeding through the neighborhood and damaging some nearby landscaping. Eventually the teens eventually made their way to school where there were spotted by police. Instead of finding a parking spot along with other fellow students, the teens took off at a high rate of speed across the parking lot and into the football field. The teens then fled on foot and were apprehended while trying to hide from police.

Vehicle theft

The 17 year old boy and 16 year old girl who started their Monday morning off with some real life ‘Grand Theft Auto’ were taken to a nearby juvenile detention for evading police and vehicle theft. The penalty for theft in Utah varies depending on the value of the item stolen. When that item is an “operable motor vehicle” as stated in Section 76-6-412, the theft is punishable as a second degree felony. This is the case even if the car is a junker with very low monetary value.

Juvenile defense

Photo by: North Charlston

Unless the charges are serious felonies as listed in Utah’s Serious Youth Offender Law (78A-6-702), most cases involving minors will stay within the juvenile court’s jurisdiction. The juvenile court tends to be more lenient than the district court as they take into account what is best for the minor as well as the public. It is still best to consult with a juvenile defense attorney concerning any charges brought against minors, regardless of the severity of those charges.

Utah Teen Fleeing Police in Stolen Vehicle Causes Fatal Accident

A Utah teenager fleeing police in a stolen vehicle caused a fatal accident in Santaquin on Sunday.

Fleeing in a stolen vehicle

Photo by: Scott Davidson

Officers from the Payson City Police Department were on the lookout for a stolen truck when an officer on duty spotted a 17 year old juvenile driving the stolen vehicle Sunday night. The officer attempted to pull the teen over, however the teen failed to stop on command and fled. Later that same evening another officer on I-15 near Santaquin attempted to pull the teen over when the teen again failed to stop for police, resulting in a pursuit. While evading the police officer, the teen left the interstate and collided with a vehicle, critically injuring the other driver. That other driver who was a 17 year old female later died from her injuries.

Felony charges

The teenage driver of the stolen vehicle was transported to the hospital for injuries sustained in the accident but will be transferred to the custody of a youth detention center upon his medical release. He will face numerous charges which could include:

• Theft of “an operable motor vehicle”, a second degree felony as stated in Utah Code 76-6-412;

• “Failure to respond to officer’s signal to stop . . . and while so doing causes death or serious bodily injury to another person” another second degree felony (41-6a-210);

• Other felony charges if it is determined the boy was under the influence of drugs or alcohol.

If the teen’s charges are transferred from juvenile court to district court, he may face several years behind bars. For legal support regarding juvenile cases or those that may involve both courts, contact an attorney that handles both juvenile and criminal defense cases.

19 Year Old Arrested a Second Time after Escape from Police Custody

A 19 year old Utah teen was arrested a second time after he managed an escape from police custody.

Houdini

Photo by: Victor

19 year old Noah Randall Cook was apprehended by Saratoga Springs police after a two day hunt for the teen who had somehow managed to slip away during an arrest. Cook’s original arrest came after he had confronted a female victim in a supermarket, assaulting her while preventing her from leaving or calling for help. Police responded and handcuffed Cook, placing him in the back of the police car. Once at the station, a handcuffed and shackled Cook was able to wriggle his way free and make a break for temporary freedom. After evading police for two days, Cook was located and arrested for a variety of charges including escape from police custody.

Escape from police custody

Utah Code 76-8-309 states: “A prisoner is guilty of escape [from police custody] if the prisoner leaves official custody without lawful authorization. . . Escape under this subsection is a third degree felony”. That section goes on to explain the penalties are increased to a second degree felony if the individual escapes a state prison. The penalties are increased to a first degree felony if the prison is found guilty of aggravated escape, in which a dangerous weapon is used or bodily injury to another occurs.

Prolonging the inevitable

For whatever reason Cook chose to assault and terrify the female victim in Walmart, running from his poor choices was just adding more trouble to his case. Beyond the charges for his actions at the supermarket, Cook is now facing an additional felony charge for his escape from police custody and he may be considered a flight risk, reducing his changes at being able to post bail. For teens and young adults caught breaking the law, please do not resist an arrest. Instead exercise your right to request the aid of an attorney.

Joyriding in Stolen Vehicle Leads to Death of a Police Officer

Authorities have announced that three Utah teenagers who were joyriding in a stolen vehicle are the ones responsible for the death of a West Valley police officer.

Struck by stolen vehicle

Officer struck by stolen vehicle
Photo by: Tiocfaidh ár lá 1916

A report of a stolen vehicle during the early morning hours on Sunday November 6th prompted a quick response by law enforcement. During the short police chase, 25 year old Officer Cody Brotherson exited his vehicle to set up spike strips when the thieves struck Officer Brotherson with the stolen vehicle, killing him. The teens then lost control of the stolen vehicle and were apprehended shortly after.

Not even old enough to drive

The three teenage boys who were responsible for killing Officer Brotherson with the stolen vehicle were not even old enough to drive; two of the teens were 15 years old and the third was only 14. It is not known at this time whether or not the teens deliberately hit Officer Brotherson or if it was a result of poor vision and/or inexperienced drivers.

Possible charges

Although there is no word yet on what kind of charges the teens could be facing, their joyride in a stolen vehicle may end with charges such as:

• Driving without a license, an infraction (53-3-202),
• Driving without vehicle insurance, a class C misdemeanor (41-12a-302)
• Unauthorized control of a motor vehicle (joyriding) that is used to commit a felony, a third degree felony (41-1a-1314),
• Theft of a vehicle, a second degree felony (76-6-412),
• Fleeing police with said action resulting in death or bodily injury of another person, second degree felony ( 41-6a-210),
• Manslaughter, a second degree felony (76-5-205),
• Reckless conduct which results in the murder of a police officer, a first degree felony (76-5-203), and/or
• Aggravated murder, a capital felony (76-5-202). This grave charge is a possibility if investigators determine the teens intentionally hit and killed Officer Brotherson.

A Joyride that was not so joyful

Photo by: David K.
Photo by: David K.

These young Utah teenagers probably didn’t expect their joyride in a stolen vehicle to end in the death of a police officer. It is important for youth to know that there are almost always consequences to poor choices; the penalties for these teens are expected to include criminal charges as well as the life-long guilt from taking another’s life.