New Dangerous Trend Involves Teens Consuming Alcohol through Their Nether Regions

Utah parents are being warned about a dangerous trend going around that involves teens consuming alcohol through their nether regions.

Alcohol consumption

Photo by: Johnny Silvercloud

There are many ways in which alcohol can be consumed such as sipping a fine wine, having a casual beer, or doing shots of hard alcohol. Then there are drinking methods that are considered more “fun” and therefore appealing to the younger generation, including teens. These include: beer bongs, shot-gunning, Jello shots, and even keg stands (where kegs of beer are allowed). However alcohol is consumed, it should only be done by those 21 years of age or older.

Alcohol and teens

Teens are warned about consuming alcohol for several reasons:

• Alcohol can develop developing brains;
• Teens are more likely to drink excessively, leading to alcohol poisoning; and
• Teens may be more likely to drive drunk instead of asking parents or other responsible adult for a ride home.

Teenagers who drink may try to fool their parents or think they can pass a breathalyzer by consuming alcohol without orally ingesting it. This is when alcohol becomes increasingly dangerous.

Alcohol enemas

Alcohol Enema
Photo by: Justin Taylor

Perhaps in an effort to hide the smell of alcohol on their breath or just to be different, many teens are becoming involved in a dangerous new trend that involves consuming alcohol through their nether regions. Alcohol enemas, otherwise known as butt-chugging needs little explanations as the name describes exactly how the alcohol is entering the body. What isn’t well known is the danger being putting alcohol in direct contact with the thin membranes of the rectum. Unlike drinking where the body has a chance at warding off alcohol poisoning by breaking down the alcohol or vomiting the excess, consuming alcohol through the rectum has no such safeguard. Alcohol enemas along with alcohol injections or eyeballing alcohol is an extremely dangerous practice that could end in death and criminal charges for everyone else involved.

Criminal charges

Beyond the obvious physical dangers of alcohol enemas, there are also risks of criminal charges to discuss with teens. With regards to teens attempting to avoid a DUI, no matter the way alcohol enters a body, breathalyzers monitor the BAC or blood alcohol content that is evident in breath. If alcohol is consumed orally or anally, the BAC will be the same. Another legal risk of alcohol enemas comes to those who perform or help someone else perform one. If the person receiving the alcohol enema is seriously injured or killed, those who performed the enema can face murder charges. For more information on the legal ramifications of teens and alcohol, consult with a criminal defense attorney today.

Underage Drinking on Prom Night Likely Cause of Deadly Utah Crash

A deadly car crash that occurred near Moab, Utah following prom night was likely caused by underage drinking mixed with excessive vehicle speed.

2 teenagers dead and 3 critically injured

Underage Drinking
Photo by: Josh Hallet

In the early morning hours following a prom dance the night before, five teenagers were driving a 2003 Subaru Impreza when the vehicle left the roadway and rolled several times. Three of the teens in the vehicle were ejected; two of those ejected were killed; 16 year old Conner Denney and 14 year old Taylor Bryant. The other teen ejected and the two teens in the car were all flown to area hospitals in critical condition. Police believe that the crash was due to driving at high speeds mixed with underage drinking.

Underage drinking and driving

Underage drinking can be hazardous, especially when inexperienced drivers attempt to operate a vehicle under the influence. The state of Utah has decided that adults who have years of experience driving should still refrain from driving if their blood alcohol limit is over .05%. Teens who drink are known to far surpass this limit. Instead of enjoying a beer with dinner like a responsible adult, teens are more likely to binge drink, making them very drunk in a short period of time.

Alcohol and the teen brain

Photo by: wyinoue
Photo by: wyinoue

Even if a teenager stays away from vehicles when drunk, the alcohol can have damaging effects on their body, especially the growing and maturing brain. According to the National Institute on Alcohol Abuse and Alcoholism, “the adolescent brain may be uniquely sensitive to alcohol’s effects because major changes in brain structure and function occur during this developmental period. ( . . . ) Alcohol exposure during adolescence can have long-lasting effects and may interfere with normal brain functioning during adulthood.”

Other health risks

There are more health risks associated with underage drinking that teens should be aware of such as: potentially fatal alcohol poisoning which can occur from drinking too much too quickly; permanent liver damage from elevated liver enzymes caused by underage drinking; damage to growth hormone production which can alter puberty. Additionally, it is difficult for teens to understand alcoholism should they become addicted and they are less likely to seek help due to them being under the legal age to consume alcohol.

Criminal penalties

Photo by: Sonny Abesamis
Photo by: Sonny Abesamis

Beyond the health risks, there are criminal penalties for those who choose to engage in underage drinking and even far greater penalties if someone is hurt or killed because of a DUI. For teens who are facing criminal charges due to underage drinking or drinking and driving, contact a juvenile defense attorney immediately.

Utah Teenager Crashes Stolen Vehicle into Home

A teenager from Utah was arrested after she crashed a stolen vehicle into a home, causing major damage to the structure.

Taking the family car for a spin

Photo by: Andy Armstrong
Photo by: Andy Armstrong

18 year old Kylee Westenskow from Ogden, Utah was driving a stolen vehicle belonging to her grandparents when she left the road and crashed into a home in Highland, nearly taking off the side of their garage. When police arrested Westenskow they discovered she was did not have her license and was under the influence of marijuana at the time of the accident.

Possession of a stolen vehicle

The 18 year old, who according to Facebook is a student at Ben Lomand High School, is facing multiple misdemeanors including DUI and reckless driving. She is also facing a second degree felony for possession of a stolen vehicle; a charge that could put her behind bars for as long as 15 years. Utah Code 76-6-412 states “Theft of property and services as provided in this chapter is punishable:

a) As a second degree felony if the: ( . . . ) Property stolen is a firearm or an operable motor vehicle; ( . . . )”

A young felon

At just 18 years old, this teenager who is likely in her senior year of high school will be a felon if convicted for the charge of possession of a stolen vehicle. Even if she doesn’t serve the full sentence behind bars, the label of felon will follow her for seven years after she has finished her sentence and/or probation. This can make it difficult to get housing and employment which is not something a new adult should have to face.

Juvenile and criminal defense

If any juveniles or pseudo adults are facing criminal charges such as possession of a stolen vehicle, contact an attorney who is experienced in helping individuals of all ages.

Teens Who Drink and Drive

Teens and alcohol don’t mix and very often it seems that teens are driving don’t mix either; so what about those teens that do both – drink and drive?

Underage DUI’s

Renee Silverman
Renee Silverman

Teens and young adults under the age of 21 are not legally permitted to drink alcohol and no one of any age should get behind the wheel of a car after drinking. When both of these laws are broken at once and teens make the dangerous choice to drink and drive, the statistics can get ugly. Some of the facts stated by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) are:

• “One in 10 teens in high school drinks and drives.

• Young drivers (ages 6-20) are 17 times more likely to die in a crash when they have a blood alcohol concentration [BAC] of .08%.

• 85% of teens in high school who report drinking and driving in the past month also say they binge drank [more than 5 alcoholic drinks within a couple hours]”

Penalties for teens who drink and drive

Not only do teens need to worry about the dangers of alcohol on a young brain and the messy combination mixing alcohol with driving, teens who are caught driving drunk can expect certain penalties as well. These penalties can include a fine too large for any after school job to afford as well as 48 hours of house arrest or even detention along with probation. Teens who drink and drive can usually expect to lose their driver’s license for anywhere from 6 months until they turn 21 years old. They are also expected to attend alcohol abuse classes.

Not worth it

Drink and Drive
Photo by: Jono Haysom

Making the choice to drink and drive is a choice with more disadvantages than any buzz is worth. If that bad choice is made, it is important to understand how teens fit into the legal system. Teenagers who are facing charges in juvenile court for minor consumption of underage DUI should be represented by a juvenile defense attorney. Those who are facing criminal charges with the possibility of being charged as an adult should speak with a criminal defense attorney. The best bet would be to find an attorney who can handle anything from a juvenile misdemeanor to an adult felony for any charge accrued by a teen.

Teen Alcohol Use in Utah

Teen alcohol use in Utah has seen a slight decreased over the last five years, yet the numbers of youth who consume alcoholic beverages regularly is still concerning.

Teen alcohol use

Teen Alcohol Use
Photo by: Incase

The average age for kids to try alcohol is 13 years old, when hormone driven emotions are at an all-time high and the youth are more susceptible to peer pressure. Although a majority of kids state that they do not approve of teen alcohol use, data collected by the National Institute of Alcohol Abuse and Alcoholism showed that three-fourths of teens will have tried alcohol by the time they are seniors in high school.

Dangers of teen alcohol use

Teen alcohol use can start with one drink and quickly lead into other dangerous behavior such as drunk driving and binge drinking. Over 5,000 teens and young adults under the age of 21 die each year from alcohol related deaths from incidents like alcohol poisoning from binge drinking and drunk driving. Those that survive but continue with underage drinking have a heightened chance of abusing other substances such as illegal drugs, which raises the teen mortality rate as well.

Minor consumption

Photo by: -EMR-
Photo by: -EMR-

Another problem that can arise with teen alcohol use is minor consumption and other alcohol-related criminal charges. Teens who are caught drinking alcohol before the age of 21 risk losing their driving privileges while also being required to attend alcohol education courses. If they drink and drive however, they may face time in juvenile detention or adult jail, especially if an injury to another person occurred due to their driving intoxicated.

Preventing teen drinking

The teenage years are a difficult time when kids may be emotionally unstable while also discovering their newfound independence that comes with age. Educating teens about the harmful effects that alcohol and drugs can have on their developing brains is important as well as teaching them coping techniques for the drama that is so prominent in their lives.