19 Year Old Arrested a Second Time after Escape from Police Custody

A 19 year old Utah teen was arrested a second time after he managed an escape from police custody.

Houdini

Photo by: Victor

19 year old Noah Randall Cook was apprehended by Saratoga Springs police after a two day hunt for the teen who had somehow managed to slip away during an arrest. Cook’s original arrest came after he had confronted a female victim in a supermarket, assaulting her while preventing her from leaving or calling for help. Police responded and handcuffed Cook, placing him in the back of the police car. Once at the station, a handcuffed and shackled Cook was able to wriggle his way free and make a break for temporary freedom. After evading police for two days, Cook was located and arrested for a variety of charges including escape from police custody.

Escape from police custody

Utah Code 76-8-309 states: “A prisoner is guilty of escape [from police custody] if the prisoner leaves official custody without lawful authorization. . . Escape under this subsection is a third degree felony”. That section goes on to explain the penalties are increased to a second degree felony if the individual escapes a state prison. The penalties are increased to a first degree felony if the prison is found guilty of aggravated escape, in which a dangerous weapon is used or bodily injury to another occurs.

Prolonging the inevitable

For whatever reason Cook chose to assault and terrify the female victim in Walmart, running from his poor choices was just adding more trouble to his case. Beyond the charges for his actions at the supermarket, Cook is now facing an additional felony charge for his escape from police custody and he may be considered a flight risk, reducing his changes at being able to post bail. For teens and young adults caught breaking the law, please do not resist an arrest. Instead exercise your right to request the aid of an attorney.

Utah Teens May Be Allowed to Vote in Primaries before the Age of 18

Utah teens, many of whom are eager to let their voices be heard may now be allowed to vote in the primaries before they reach the age of 18.

Teen involvement in politics

Photo by: AFGE

Teens all over Utah have been taking a stand regarding political and debate topics, yet until now they have been unable to vote in favor of those who share their beliefs until they reach the age of 18. That barrier has now been changed to allow those approaching adulthood to join in on the primaries before they turn 18 years old.

Amended eligibility for voter registration

Utah Code 20A-2-101 was recently amended to allow teens to register and vote prior to them reaching the age of 18. That section now states: “. . . an individual may register to vote in an election who:

(a) Is a citizen of the United States;

(b) Has been a resident of Utah for at least the 30 days immediately before the election;

(c) Will be:
(i) At least 18 years of age on the day of the election; or

(ii) If the election is a regular primary election, a municipal primary election, or a Western States Presidential Primary:

(A) 17 years of age on or before the day of the regular primary election, municipal primary election, or Western States Presidential Primary; and

(B) 18 years of age on or before the day of the general election that immediately follows the regular primary election, municipal primary election, or Western States Presidential Primary; and

(d) currently resides within the voting district or precinct in which the individual applies to register to vote.”

Register now

Photo by: Tony Webster

Teens who are eligible to vote in the primaries should register soon as the last day to register by mail is approaching quickly with primaries taking place at the end of June. For more information on registering teens to vote, contact the local county clerk’s office.

Vehicle Burglary

Vehicle burglaries can occur regardless of how upscale the neighborhood, and many of those car break-ins are done by minors from the same area. Whether done out of boredom or to find loose change, breaking into a car is against the law whether or not anything ends up stolen.

Vehicle Burglary

Photo by: Hey Paul

Unlawful entrance to a vehicle can result in criminal charges even if nothing of value is removed from the vehicle. Utah Code 76-6-204 explains that “any person who unlawfully enters any vehicle with intent to commit a felony or theft is guilty of a burglary of a vehicle.” If a teen opens a car hoping to find loose change or a GPS system and all they find are empty soda bottles and fast food wrappers, they are still entering the vehicle with the intent to commit a theft. Burglary of a vehicle is a class A misdemeanor, punishable by up to a year in jail and a large fine.

Other charges

If upon entering a vehicle illegally the teen finds and removes items of value, they will obviously face charges of theft if caught. The punishment for theft depends on the value of the items stolen. According to Utah Code 76-6-412, the charges for theft can range from a class B misdemeanor for theft of items valued under $500 to a second degree felony is the value of the stolen item exceeds $5,000 or is a firearm. There are other possible charges related to vehicle burglary including:

• Possession of burglary tools, a class A misdemeanor if items were needed to break into vehicles as explain in 76-6-205;

• Criminal mischief if the vehicle or any item inside was damaged as described in 76-6-106 with penalties varying depending on “pecuniary loss” during the vehicle burglary; or even

• Aggravated robbery, a first degree felony if the vehicle broken into was occupied by a driver according to Utah Code 76-6-302.

Teens who may view vehicle burglaries as simple, no-risk crimes should be educated on the potential legal outcome that could result from breaking into a vehicle. Those minors already facing charges should consult with a juvenile defense attorney.

Vandalism and Abuse of a flag at Utah High School

The small town of Hurricane, Utah has once again gained national attention after vandalism and signs of abuse of a flag were found at the local high school.

Small town, big news

Photo by: Lin Cheong

The small southern Utah town has made the news again not even a month after two students from Hurricane High School posted a disturbingly racist post on social media, gaining national attention and outrage. Now Hurricane, Utah has made headlines for flying an Isis flag at the local high school?

Legitimate threat or immature prank

Early last Thursday morning, one or more individuals removed the American flag from a flagpole outside the Hurricane High school, desecrating it. They then proceeded to replace the American flag with an Isis flag and continued their humorless prank by spray painting the side of the building. Concerned over the possibility of a terrorist threat, the local police department contacted the Federal Bureau of Investigations who deemed there to be no danger. The possibility of a prank is likely which could have been carried out by local residents or even students.

Abuse of a flag is no joke

Whether or not the shout out to Isis was a prank or not, abuse of a flag is not tolerated. Utah Code 76-9-601 states: “A person is guilty of abuse of a flag if he . . . Knowingly casts contempt upon the flag of the United States or of any state of the United States by publicly mutilating, defacing, defiling, burning, or trampling upon it. Abuse of a flag is a class B misdemeanor.” Adults or teens who wish to voice their frustration with the government are encouraged to seek legal avenues to make their voices heard.

Youth Hunters in Utah

There are many youth hunters in Utah who join their families for traditional hunting trips. These kids may have grown up surrounded by older family members who have been hunting for years, but they and their parents may not know what is required for them to participate.

Hunting in Utah

Youth Hunters in Utah
Photo by: Bob ‘n’ Renee

Hunting is a big sport in Utah with many kids becoming involved fairly young. Fishing is common for beginners while many kids gradually move on to hunt small game and even larger game, cougar or bear as they get older. Although the State of Utah “encourage[es] Utah’s youth to hunt, fish, watch wildlife and participate in shooting sports” there are some guidelines that must be obeyed as well as education required before they can hunt in Utah.

Age requirements

According to the Utah Division of Wildlife Resources, “In 2008, the Utah Legislature removed the minimum age requirement for hunting small game”. With adult supervision, all kids under the age of 15 are allowed to hunt duck, partridge, pheasant, turkey and waterfowl while those 12 or older may participate in big game, cougar and bear hunts.

Education and parental supervision

Not every child can pick up a rifle and head out hunting with their family. The child must be old enough to understand and complete a hunter education course first. One educated and registered, licensed youth hunters under the age of 15 must be supervised by an adult while hunting, no matter how experienced they are. Utah Code also states in 76-10-509 that older teens hunting alone must have permission from their parent or guardian to be in possession of a weapon and that firearm may not be a “handgun, ( . . . ) short barreled rifle, short barreled shotgun, or a fully automatic weapon” as described in section 76-10-509.4.